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Referral details

Case 99422

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Referral category

Salivary gland / salivary stone in duct

Region of interest

right submandibular gland

Referral reason

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Canaray 99422

1. Large right submandibular sialolith

There is large, well-defined, oval radiopacity present in the right submandibular space, just medial to the inferior mandibular cortex, and inferior to the mylohyoid line. This radiopacity demonstrates a density comparable to dentin or cortical bone, and appears to be organized in concentric layers. This entity demonstrates no effects on the surrounding hard tissue structures. These findings suggest the presence of a large right submandibular sialolith, which is likely located within the proximal portion of the right Wharton's duct. However, sialography is needed to confirm its precise location. If the patient does not demonstrate any signs or symptoms of glandular obstruction, this may not be a significant finding.

Orthogonal measurements of the sialolith

These orthogonal cross-sectional images demonstrate the approximate superoinferior, anteroposterior, and mediolateral dimensions of the large sialolith in the right submandibular space.

Axial views of the right submandibular space

These axial cross-sectional images demonstrate the presence of a large, oval radiopacity in the right submandibular space. This radiopacity demonstrates a density comparable to cortical bone or dentin.

Coronal views of the right submandibular space

These coronal cross-sectional images demonstrate that this sialolith is located medial to the inferior mandibular cortex, distal to tooth 47, and inferior to the mylohyoid line.

Sagittal views of the right submandibular space

These sagittal cross-sectional images demonstrate that the sialolith has an internal structure composed of concentric layers of radiopacity intermixed with regions of relative radiolucency. This is likely secondary to the cyclic nature of obstructive salivary gland disease.